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  • CT Scan 16-Slice

    Exceptional 16-slice imaging in a single breath-hold

    Both of our facilities are leading the way in revolutionizing CT scanning and patient safety with our award-winning GE Healthcare LightSpeed. As a breakthrough innovation, our CT system supports acquisitions of up to 16 slices per rotation with speed, sub-millimeter resolution and effective dose optimization.

    Our LightSpeed CT system gives us the power to scan finer, further and faster:

    • Finer – Wafer-thin images of a patient’s anatomy for improved spatial resolution
    • Further – Increased anatomical coverage with thinner slices
    • Faster – 0.5-second rotation speeds translate to faster exams and clearer images with fewer artifacts caused by patient movement

    With our 16-slice CT system, Westcoast Radiology Imaging is pushing clinical applications to a higher level to give you a wider range of imaging capabilities.

    What’s more, our LightSpeed CT system provides exceptional imaging capabilities for:

    • Vascular Applications
    • Cardiac Applications
    • Cardiac and vascular imaging

    Cardiac and vascular imaging are where the difference lies.

    About your CT scan

    Please follow these special instructions:

    • If you have diabetes, you may be asked to temporarily alter your medication
    • Please arrive at the imaging center at least 15 minutes before your appointment
    • Wear loose, comfortable clothing

    Women may wish to wear pants. You may be asked to remove jewelry, metal objects, eyeglasses or dental pieces. You may also be asked to wear disposable pants (scrubs).

    In addition, please let us know if you might be pregnant.

    How does a CT scanner work?

    A CT scanner is an x-ray machine that rotates a detector 360 degrees around your body as you lie on a table. The detector measures differences in density of body parts as x-rays pass through your body. The scanner uses a powerful computer to create multiple images, or image “slices”, that provide very detailed information about your body’s health. CT allows imaging of organs not viewable by standard x-ray procedures.

    What happens during the test?

    A technologist will escort you to the CT scanner room. You will be asked to lie on the scanner table. In some cases, you may be given an injection and/or drink involving iodinated contrast agent (x-ray dye) before or during the scan. The agent helps the doctor to better view certain body parts.

    The table will move during the scan. You will be asked to stay still and not to breathe for short periods while the machine is scanning. You will be able to hear and talk to the technologist, who will be in the next room.

    How do I prepare?

    Make sure you understand from your doctor exactly why you are having the exam, and what part of your body is to be scanned. Your doctor will let you know if there are any special preparations you will need before the exam.

    Make sure you understand and follow these directions carefully. If you do not, your exam may need to be rescheduled.

    • If you have diabetes, you may be asked to temporarily alter your medication
    • You may be asked to take a drink containing a contrast agent before your exam

    Please arrive at the imaging center at least 15 minutes before your appointment to be checked in for your exam. You may be asked to wear disposable pants (scrubs).

    What should I wear?

    Wear comfortable, loose clothing. Women may wish to wear pants. You may be asked to remove jewelry, metal objects, eyeglasses or dental pieces.

    How is MRI different from CT?

    MRI uses a strong magnet and radio waves to create high resolution images, while CT (computed tomography) uses x-rays. MRI and CT images provide slightly different information to doctors.

    These differences depend on the area being imaged. Your doctor may order one or both of these tests for you.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    How is CT especially useful?

    Ct is useful in diagnosing many health problems. It provides highly detailed cross-sectional images of any area of the body. It is also useful for evaluating blood vessel health.

    Will I be able to feel the scan?

    No, the scan is painless, but you will hear a swirling noise while the scanner is on. You may feel some mild warmth if a contrast agent is injected.

    What are the risks?

    Rarely, some people have an allergic reaction to the contrast agent. This may cause a rash, low blood pressure or even some difficulty breathing. If a strong allergic reaction happens, it is treated as an emergency. If you are breast-feeding, ask
    your doctor how long you should hold off after the contrast is given.

    With a CT, like a standard x-ray, there is a small exposure to radiation. The radiation from a CT scan may be slightly more than from a regular x-ray, but it is very small and unlikely to cause any harm.

    • Let your doctor know if you have an allergy to iodine
    • Let your doctor know if you are or may be pregnant or are breastfeeding

    How long does a CT scan take?

    It may take 15-30 minutes for the exam, depending on what scans your doctor has ordered. At the end, any IV that is inserted to deliver contrast agent will be removed. You can then go back to your normal activities.

    When will I get my test results?

    The radiologist will review your test results and provide a report to your doctor.

    Reports will be forwarded to your doctor in a timely manner. Please follow up with your doctor to get your test results.